Foot Function & Fascial Lines Series, General

Are you doing short foot correctly? | Clearing the confusion

I think it goes without saying that I have a passion for sharing the power of foot activation and how it fascially connects to central core stabilization.  My go-to for foot activation is none other than – short foot!

Considered by some as merely of foot-specific exercise and not one that is integrated or applicable to total body function, I think it’s time to clear the confusion around this exercise – and foot function in general!

Having taught short foot to professionals, patients and athletes all around the world for over 10 years, I’ve seen it all.   I’ve literally taught short foot to over 25,000 people and have seen every confusion, mis-cueing, compensation pattern and foot type.

Because I understand the power of proper short foot activation, I get a little let’s say passionate when I see and hear professionals cueing short foot incorrectly.

What gets me even more worked up is that those that are cueing short foot incorrectly are professionals who are being followed and trusted as “experts” in the industry.

The Dunning-Kruger Effect

Having thousands of Instagram followers and posting cool pictures that favor natural foot function does not make one a foot expert.   Yet what these professionals are posting and saying is being taken as gospel, possibly because they are being stated with such confidence it must be correct.  Right?

Sadly most of the posts and statements that are being made are black and white concepts.  The foot is supposed to do X and therefore Y.    I wish it was that easy, but the human body is far too complex to be X = Y.    There is a lot of grey when it comes to programming, cueing and yes – overall foot function.

What is the risk of posting pictures and statements or teaching concepts that are black and white or X = Y?   People can get hurt.   Trust gets broken.   Confusion gets created.

Clearing the Confusion on Short Foot

It’s time to set the record straight.    I”m going to go into the proper way to cue and execute short foot.    My cueing technique is backed by anatomy, science and a deep understanding of true foot function.    No conclusions are being made based off of associations.

Disclaimer:   After reading this, if you realize that have been doing short foot incorrectly. It’s okay!   This is not an attack on anyone or a criticism to any professional out there – even to the ones that are cueing short foot incorrectly.   I just want short foot to be represented in its true form so that we get the optimal benefits and reduce the risk of injury. 

Step 1 – Teach 1 foot at a time. 

I usually cue to go into a split stance so that you can focus on just the front foot initially.

Why we want to teach one foot at a time is that the mind-muscle connection of executing short foot bilateral is too high for many clients.   To start with one foot allows the focus to be centered on a more local foot engagement.

Step 2 – Slightly bend the knees to unlock them 

When we do short foot we create a locking mechanism up the lower extremity.   If you do short foot on a fully extended knee you are essentially locking a locked joint.   This can create shear to the meniscus and create injury to our clients.

As the Hippocratic Oath states “thou shalt do no harm” – so I kindly remind you to slightly bend the knees.

Step 3 – Place the foot in neutral and find the foot tripod

foot-tripod-bottom-points

Ensuring the rear foot is not pronated during short foot is critical – reason being is that a pronated foot is unlocked and unstable with the muscles in a lengthened position.    This makes in ineffective to engage short foot.

After the rear foot is put into a neutral position, then it’s time to find the foot tripod.  This means to center body weight under the 1st metatarsal head, 5th metatarsal head and heel.

Disclaimer: This is NOT to be confused with the foot staying on the tripod throughout the exercise – or to push the tripod down during short foot. 

Step 4 – Lift the toes, spread them out and place them on the ground 

To further complete the base of support and centered foot position we need all digits to be spread wide and long.    We will shortly see that the true action of short foot is in the digits which is why this is going to be an important aspect of the short foot cue.

Step 5 – While exhaling, push the tips of the toes down into the ground 

The true cue for short foot is in the long flexors (FHL, FDL) which insert into the plantar, distal aspect of the toes.   These muscles anchor or root the tips of the toes (think toenails) down into the ground.

img_7139.jpgThe pushing of the distal tips of the toes into the ground not only activates the long flexors but it also engages the plantar fascia via the reverse windlass mechanism.   Both the action of the long flexors and plantar fascia is to increase the arches of the foot (longitudinal and transverse) which ultimately lifts us off of the ball of the foot.

What we should see when we push the tips of the toes down into the ground is that the 1st metatarsal head lifts off of the ground.

Now to be clear, I don’t want YOU to lift the 1st metatarsal head off of the ground – I want it to be a reaction of the contraction.

If YOU lift the 1st metatarsal head off of the ground, chances are you are going to over engage short foot and can create too much hypertonicity.

Now this is where the cueing goes wrong!

Many – I repeat – many professionals are cueing short foot as pushing the 1st metatarsal head down into the ground.   This is wrong.  This is incorrect.  This does not transverse to function.   This is a literal translation of the foot tripod and a gross misrepresentation of true function of the foot.    (More on this soon!)

Step 6 – Incorporate the pelvic floor 

The final step we want to integrate with short foot is the deep core.   To be truly integrated we need the entire Deep Front Line to be a part of this short foot exercise.  This means that as we exhale, we want to focus on lifting our pelvic floor and pushing the tips of our toes down into the ground.

The result?

All of the central domes in our body stack.   The arch, the pelvic floor, the diaphragm – and technically our palate all lift during activation.

Clearing the Confusion! 

So now that we know the proper way to cue short foot.   It’s time to clear the confusion how short foot.   The most common incorrect cue that I hear is pushing the 1st metatarsal head down as the activation.

I am not sure who started this trend but it is wrong.

Yes we do start by finding our foot tripod – but that doesn’t mean we should literally push into the foot tripod as the form of foot activation for foot stability.

DFL

So why not?     We need to defend our reason of why not!

Answer #1 –  Deep Front Line.    

Short Foot is a Deep Front Line activation.  Remember the true purpose of activating our feet is to get them to “talk to” our core or center.

If we look at the Deep Front Line, the muscles of the feet that we see are the Flexor Hallucis Longus, Flexor Digitorum Longus, Posterior Tibialis and Anterior Tibialis.

As mentioned earlier, the cueing I use for short foot is to push the tips of the toes down into the ground.  The reason?  Because this is the action of the flexors!

When we push the 1st metatarsal down into the ground we are activating the peroneus longus muscle.

Do you see that muscle in the Deep Front Line?   I don’t either!

Answer #2 – 1st Ray Plantarflexion & the 1st MPJ

To further understand the purpose of 1st metatarsal plantar flexion (or pushing the 1st met down) we need to understand the true functional reason behind this action.

When does our 1st metatarsal FUNCTIONALLY want to plantar flex?

During push-off!

The action of 1st metatarsal plantar flexion is to allow the 1st MPJ to dorsiflexion – an action that occurs during push-off.   When we take a step, run or jump our great toe dorsiflexes to create a rigid lever for forward (or vertical) progression.

I did a whole blog series on the 1st MPJ where I went into the actions of slide, glide and jam but essentially one of the most critical steps in dorsiflexion of the big toe is 1st metatarsal plantar flexion.    However.   We must pause there.   This 1st metatarsal plantar flexion is actually not DOWN but rather it is BEHIND us.

1st mpj

 

If you see in the image to the right, 1st metatarsal plantar flexion is actual BEHIND us as
we shift our COG forward, this is how we truly dorsiflex the great toe.

How does this relate back to short foot?  This means that to train the 1st metatarsal to literally push down into the ground has no true functional transfer.

Answer #3 – Sesamoids 

The final reason of why I do not cue pushing the 1st metatarsal head down has to do with the sesamoids.   The sesamoids are two small bones that sit within the Flexor Hallucis Brevis tendons and sit directly under the 1st metatarsal head.

Like the patella (knee cap) the sesamoids are not intended to be passive weight bearing bones but rather ones that transfer force during functional movement.

sesamoidThe image to the left shows that the sesamoids are the lowest bones in the foot and if there is intentional 1st met plantarflexion into the ground (due to a miscue of short foot) then there is increased force to these small bones.

This can greatly increase the chance for sesamoiditis and sesamoid fractures – two conditions that are a b*#! to treat.

In addition, some of the clients and patients being cued to push down into their 1st metatarsal head during short foot may actually have a functional plantarflexed first ray which can be exacerbated with improper short foot cueing.   The negative impact of a plantar flexed 1st metatarsal (ray) is functional hallux limitus, which can lead to a myriad of compensation patterns during walking.

Did I confuse you more?

If the above was a little like “what the hell is she talking about” then good!   This is is how confusing the foot is!

It is not black and white.   It is not X = Y.

It is grey with a lot of exceptions with any cue or exercise.   This is why I created the Barefoot Training Specialist® Certification and have trained a very niche group of qualified Master Instructors under EBFA Global.

Are you more of an auditory learner?

Tune in below for a video summary I did on this exact topic.

Still confused?    Email me!     dremily@ebfafitness.com

In summary, honor the power of the foot.   Consider who you are using as your sources.   Ask questions.   And don’t take anything anyone says as gospel.   Ask for the WHY?

Stay #barefootstrong

Dr Emily Splichal, DPM, MS, CES

 

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Foot Function & Fascial Lines Series

Tapping into Torsion | The Rotational Power of the Achilles Tendon

Power lies within the transverse plane.

We have all heard this concept at one point or another throughout our education or training career.  

javelinFrom the rotational moment of the trunk to generate power when throwing a javelin to the torque created from supination of the foot into the external rotational power of the glutes – rotational moments are in every aspect of human movement. 

The closer we look at the fascinating human body and the fascial system, the more we can find that spirals and rotations are everything and EVERYWHERE!

I want to take this time to explore an area of the body where rotational or spiraling properties are often under appreciated or perhaps not even know – within the human Achilles tendon.  

The Achilles Tendon

Enter the largest, strongest tendon in the human body – the Achilles tendon.   Formed by the gastrocnemius and soleus tendons (and sometimes plantaris), this fascinating structure is able to generate most of the elastic energy return during dynamic movement and from an evolutionary perspective is a critical structure in the spring-mass theory of movement efficiency. 

Now there are a few unique characteristics of the Achilles tendon that must be Achilles Rotationappreciated when training or rehabbing this structure.  All of these characteristics are emphasized in all trainings through EBFA Global:

  • The Achilles tendon is not one tendon but rather a stacked tendon 
  • 2/3 of the Achilles tendon is made of soleus fibers 
  • The Achilles tendon medially rotates toward its insertion
  • This rotation places the soleus fibers to the medial calcaneus 
  • While the MG / LG insert towards the lateral calcaneus

How cool are these facts?   But what does the above functionally mean?  

Functional Application #1 – Soleus Equals Power 

Since 2/3 of the Achilles tendon is soleus fibers this means that most of our elastic recoil and plantarflexion torque is coming from the fascial tension and loading of the soleus muscle and fascia.   

When you are training the elastic recoil of the Achilles tendon remember to incorporate soleus focused eccentric deceleration and acceleration training while the knee is bent or while transitioning through a knee flexion pattern.  

Functional Application #2 – Resupination of the Foot through Plantarflexion

The rotation or torsion of the Achilles tendon provides increased tensile strength IMG_9349and assists in fiber sliding during elastic movement.    In addition, due to the placement of the soleus fibers of the Achilles tendon plays a key role in thresupination action of the rearfoot during the push-off phase of gait.

This coupled concept means that when training jumping and push-off power drills emphasize a from the ground up approach the utilizes total ankle plantarflexion.   In EBFA Education we do this through teaching jumping by pushing off all 5 digits and envisioning a follow through with all digits (see image to the right) 

Functional Application #3 – Restriction of Blood Supply 

I must add that as much as torsion adds a rotational power to the Achilles tendon,  there can be a downside to this feature.   This rotation of the Achilles tendon fibers causes a disruption to the micro-circulation or blood supply to the Achille tendon. 

The area with the greatest compromise in circulation is called the watershed area and lies 2 – 6 cm above the Achilles insertion.   The mid-tendon or watershed area is the site of most Achilles tendon ruptures (especially as we age) and is the location of tendon degeneration.   

By appreciating this compromised Achilles circulation, professionals should ensurefullsizeoutput_1805 to properly warm up the elastic properties to the Achilles tendon and in those with a history of mid-tendon tendinitis to avoid movement patterns that increase stress to the watershed area of the tendon.   

In my office, I use the PowerPlate to increase micro-circulation to the Achilles tendon in my patients with a history of Achilles injury or degeneration.   Research has shown that 10 min of whole body vibration can create increased skin perfusion and decrease arterial resistance, both beneficial to tissue healing.   

Functional Application #5 – Non-Uniform Achilles Stress by Pronation

The non-uniform division of the Achilles tendon fibers with 2/3 being soleus, coupled with medial rotation of the tendon fibers there is a non-uniform stress placed on the Achilles tendon.  

Gils et al. has demonstrated that the soleus fibers are under the greatest stress with most Achilles tendon pathology occurring to the medial aspect of the tendon.   It was found that pronation increased this non-uniform stress to the soleus tendon fibers especially during the midstance phase of gait.  

Professionals who appreciate this concept can better assess how foot type and/ or a lack of foot stability can contribute to Achilles tendon pathology.    Foot strengthening and in some cases orthotics may be advisable for the prevention and management of medial Achilles tendon stress.  

To learn more about the fascinating functional foot please visit www.ebfaglobal.com or check out my book Barefoot Strong.    

Until next time, stay #barefootstrong 

Dr Emily 

www.dremilysplichal.com

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Barefoot Science, Foot Function & Fascial Lines Series

Feet, Fascia & Functional Movement Summit | London

Get ready for the first-ever Feet, Fascia and Functional Movement Summit coming to London on Sunday January 21, 2018!

As part of the EBFA Global Mentorship this one-day event features the global leaders in fascial fitness and functional movement including:

Dr Robert Schleip (via teleconference) of Fascial Fitness

Gary Ward of Anatomy in Motion

–  James Earls of Born to Walk

Dr Emily Splichal of EBFA Global

Experience lectures on the unique perspectives of these four educators and how each applies the concept of fascial integration into functional movement and human locomotion.

Let’s say hello to our Presenters!

 

Don’t miss out on this invaluable training!

Sunday January 21, 2018  | 8am – 6pm

GRANGE HOLBORN HOTEL
50-60 Southhampton Row
London, UK

Registration Fee: $300 USD

REGISTER NOW!!

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Foot Function & Fascial Lines Series

Protect Your Peripheral Nerves | Top 5 Supplements for Optimal Foot Function

We all know that keeping our feet strong is key to proper posture, optimal movement patterns and staying pain-free as we age.   In my workshops I’m a huge advocate of Barefoot BabyBoomers and keeping barefoot stimulation a key part of our lifestyle.   However to truly stay #barefootstrong as we age we need to do a little more than simply train sans footwear.

Biohacking Your Barefeet 

With changing nutritional values, toxins in our food and combating everyday stress we no longer can rely on diet and exercise to ensure our youngest, healthiest selves.   This is where I advise my patients to turn to vitamin supplementation and simple ways to #biohackthebody.

Below are some of my favorite supplements that are all designed to enhance nerve function, reduce inflammation and combat free radicals before they damage our peripheral nerves and fascial network.

Supplement #1 – Wild Blueberry Extract 

IMG_4214You may have heard that blueberries are brain food.    What makes blueberries so beneficial is that they are packed with polyphenols or compounds unique to plants.   Polyphenols which can also be found in coffee, dark chocolate and spices carry some of the strongest anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

A 2004 study by Youdim et al. found that wild blueberry supplementation enhanced neurogenesis in the aging brain with their flavonoids being able to cross the blood brain barrier.  Now you may have been told that we do not grow new brain cells or our peripheral nerves cannot regenerate – this is not true!   The research in the field of  neurogenesis is a super exciting area of medicine and is showing some exciting advances in aging, neuropathy and neurodegenerative diseases.

To maximize the benefits of blueberry polyphenols I recommend taking wild blueberry extract daily to avoid the excess sugars of eating so many blueberries daily.   Also make sure the blueberries are *wild* as these contain the highest levels of polyphenols!

Recommended Life Extension Wild Blueberry Extract

Supplement #2 – Krill Oil 

krillThis is one of my newest fav supplements for my patients.   Krill oil is similar to fish oil supplements in that they are packed with beneficial Omega-3 fatty acids (DHA & EPA).  However unlike fish oils, krill oil phospholipids have a special carotenoid called astaxanthin attached to it.   Astaxanthin is an extremely powerful antioxidant that – get this – can cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB)!   This makes Krill Oil so powerful to maintaining nerve function.

In addition to crossing the BBB omega 3’s have such a powerful anti-inflammatory benefit that they make a great replacement or alternative to traditional NSAIDs such as Advil, Aspirin or Aleve.    These anti-inflammatory benefits have shown to reduce arthritis pain, nerve inflammation and connective tissue pain.

Recommended Dr Mercola Antartica Krill Oil 

Supplement #3 – R-Lipoic Acid

This was one of my favorite supplements when I was going through medical school and was a big forerunner when it came to anti-aging supplements.   It’s great to see that it is still one of the strongest anti-oxidants on the market – and has actually been formulated to be even more powerful when taken in its sodium-R-lipoate form!

Neuropathy has a oxidative stress theory which means that to keep the nerves of the feet (and hands) healthy we need to keep our oxidative stress low!   Super R-Lipoic Acid is more bioavailable, stable, and potent, achieving 10–30 times higher peak blood levels than pure R-lipoic acid.

I also recommend taking R-lipoic acid with the next supplement and nerve-protective powerhouse ALC!

Recommended Life Extension Super R-Lipoic Acid 

Supplement # 4 – Acetyl-L-Carnitine (ALC) 

ALC is another favorite supplement when I was going through medical school and doing research in diabetic peripheral neuropathy.    Again super excited to see it’s still one of the best nerve-protective supplements on the market.

ALC like all of the above supplements has the unique ability to cross the BBB which means it’s crucial to nervous system health.   Studies have shown that ALC may have potential in exerting unique neuroprotective, neuromodulatory and neurotrophic properties that are not limited to just the central nervous system.   Study after study has shown great effects of ALC on peripheral neuropathy patients.

Recommended Life Extension Acetyl-L-Carnitine

Supplement #5 – L-Cittruline (Watermelon) 

aterWatermelon is one of my favorite pre-workout drinks due to its effect on vasodilation and circulation!  The vasodilation effect of watermelon is found in the amino acid L-Citruline which is a precursor to nitric oxide (think Viagra!).

Nitric oxide is integral to relaxing blood vessels which is necessary for healthy blood flow to the heart, muscles, nerves and throughout the entire body.  Nitric oxide helps the blood vessels maintain their flexibility so that blood flow is unrestricted – even to the smallest vessels to the peripheral nerves.

To get enough L-Citrulline for optimal circulation you’d need to eat 6 cups of watermelon or you can cut out the sugar and take a supplement.    Amino acids are always recommended to take on an empty stomach for maximum absorption.

Recommended Source Naturals L-Citrulline 

To learn more about how to protect your nervous system from inflammation and oxidation and how to #biohackyourbody please visit http://www.dremilysplichal.com

Stay #barefootstrong !

Dr Emily Splichal

 

 

 

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Foot Function & Fascial Lines Series

From Primal to Bipedal | Why we need to get off the ground and walk more!

Before you start throwing stones at me assuming that I’m bashing or discrediting any of the primal movement programs out there – please hear me out.    Anything I’m about to say does not mean I do not value the role primal movements and ground work has on restoring optimal movement patterns.   However, where these programs fall short is that ultimately we need to GET UP and being able to navigate the world of ground and gravity.   We need to be able to optimize the coordination required to load and unload impact forces, stabilize on a single leg and get from point A to point B.

When we look at the evolution of the human neuromuscular system, fascial lines and the skeleton we can see that the primary purpose behind human movement is WALKING.

From the medial rotation of the ilium creating the lateral fascial line and allowing single leg stance to the abduction of the foot’s 1st ray creating the spiral fascial line and lateral fascial line allowing the stability for a rigid lever – everything – I repeat everything favors locomotion – and we need to train the body as such.

When was the last time you walked?    I mean REALLY walked?  

walkingI’ve been blessed with the opportunity to evaluate the gait of thousands of people from all over the world and there are a few key compensations that I see in too many people.    So many people have lost the rotational element of gait.   I’m talking locked up t-spines, restricted triplanar motion of the pelvis, tight ankles and even tighter subtalar joints.

Rotational loading and unloading of the fascial system is how we transfer impact forces and the potential energy of gait.   If we lose this rotational element of gait the entire movement efficiency pattern breaks down and restrictions, compensations and connective tissue fatigue results.

So what’s causing this restriction in rotation?

Sitting, a sedentary lifestyle, driving, injury, compensation – there’s a lot of things that cause a restriction in rotation.   However there is a KEY one that is missed so often and cannot be addressed through rolling, crawling and being on the ground.

This driver of restricted rotation is so important that it is what leads me to say GET OFF OF THE GROUND AND JUST WALK!   What is it?   Short strides!

The impact of shortened stride length!

Think of the type of walking you, your clients, your family does in a typical day.    You walk around your home.   You walk around the office.   You walk around the store.    This type of walking is not the walking EVOLUTION intended.

These small stacotic steps are insufficient to optimally 1) hydrate your fascia  2) load rotational forces in the body  3) stimulate the neuromuscular system.

To maintain an optimal gait you need to STIMULATE your gait.   You need to tap into all the fascial systems with each step you take – a process that can only be achieved and a long enough stride length.

The Optimal Stride for Fascial Fitness

walk

To better understand this let’s take a look at the point in gait in which the optimal stride is happening.

One foot is initiated heel contact with the ankle dorsiflexed, hip flexed, pelvis medially rotated and posteriorly tilted.   With the foot, leg and pelvis in this position the posterior fascial line is tightened, locking the SI joint and preparing for ground contact.

Meanwhile the opposite leg is in 1st MPJ dorsiflexion ankle plantarflexion, hip extension, pelvis lateral rotation and anteriorly tilted.   With the foot, leg and pelvis in this position the psoas, plantar fascia and functional fascial lines are primed to release elastic energy upon swing phase.

Now the SHORTER the stride you take you tighten your rotations of the t-spine, pelvis and foot eventually leading to fascial tightness and compensations.

Since walking is THE most functional movement we do every day with the average adult taking 5,000 – 8,000 steps per day – improper stride length is what’s f’ing up your body.

These small steps we take to our cars, around the office or at home are killing our fascial system.    It is a cycle that can only be temporarily alleviated by rolling and crawling on the ground.

Imagine this.    You take your client through all the rolling patterns, dynamic bodyweight movements, foam rolling – all which are so great for the body – and then they leave the session and go back to waking small steps and in insufficient stride length.    They just REVERSED all the work you did.

The solution?

Walk.    And I mean really walk.   Put on your favorite shoes, grab your earbuds and walk.   Do not go on the treadmill, I need you to walk outside.   Find the pace that feeds into a momentous state.   You will feel when your body has switched and is now flowing in your fascial.   It is an effortless gait that is working WITH the ground and impact forces, not against it.

And then just walk.

Want to learn more about human locomotion, the evolution of gait and how to optimize rotations through walking.   Become a Barefoot Training Specialist with EBFA!    We are the Leaders in Barefoot Education and #fromthegroundup programming.

http://www.ebfafitness.com

Say #barefootstrong

Dr Emily Splichal

 

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Foot Function & Fascial Lines Series

Emotion Meet Motion at the 3rd Annual Barefoot Training Summit

For those who follow EBFA you know that recently I’ve been speaking a lot about INTEROCEPTION and the emotional side of movement and fitness.    When it comes to movement and mental health, they are so deeply connected that we as an industry need to start focusing on this connection.

We need to say goodbye to the days of categorizing programming as “mind body” vs. general group fitness.    We need to start to appreciate how ALL movement influences the emotional state of our clients and members, and then USE this information to better create programming that respects the body mind connection.

I’m excited to announce that the 3rd Annual Barefoot Training Summit we will be dedicated to how we can use MOTION to control our EMOTION.    From fascial fitness programming to breathing and flow-based programming you will leave this event feeling empowered and equipped with a deeper understanding of how to positively influence emotional states.

Presenter Line-Up

Jenny Burrell Headshot

     Jenny Burrell, United Kingdom 

Jenny Burrell is the head of Burrell Education one of the UK’s leading-edge educators in the field of modern Pregnancy, Post Baby, 3rd Age (Peri-to Post-Menopause) and Female Fitness, Wellness, Massage + Bodywork Therapies.

Burrell Education the UK’s only Endorsed, Accredited and Licensed Education Provider solely dedicated to education for these very special populations.

Learn more about Jenny & Burrell Education 

Chris Flores, New Jersey  

Chris Flores has over 17 years of experience in the fitness industry, and is the Head Athletic Trainer at Westfield High School, in NJ.  He is an Adjunct Professor at Kean University and a Clinical Instructor in Athletic Training for Kean, Montclair State and Seton Hall Universities.  He is a founding member of Next Generation Fitness Pros, a group dedicated to educating and networking for the fitness professional. As the owner / operator of FLO FITNESS, a people first gym, Chris’ passion is in helping high school athletes reach their goals.  Most recently, Chris achieved Master Instructor status in the Animal Flow® program, and travels globally giving courses.

Learn more about Chris Flo & Rooted Rehab

Chris Flo Headshot

Summer Headshot

 

Summer Huntington, Washington 

Summer has woven her understanding of anatomy, kinesiology and human movement & performance into practical workshops for the public. She has taught educational seminars in Clubbell Yoga worldwide since she founded it in 2012, and serves as a Head Coach for RMAX International, a company leading the functional fitness revolution for the last 18 years.

Her teaching approach is to make learning easily accessible to people from all walks of life and help them apply this knowledge to their own bodies right away, regardless of level of athleticism. Her personal training clients stay with her for years, and make drastic changes not only in physique but in body intelligence and awareness.

Learn more about Summer Huntingon & Clubbell Yoga

Lois Laynee Headshot

 

Lois Laynee, Arizona 

Lois is a dynamic, disciplined professional who has developed a wellness paradigm based upon the essential component of oxygen.

She is passionate about educating all communities of the significance of the oxygen content in their brains as well as the rest of the body.  Most importantly, she focuses on developing each person’s ability to impact their own physiology for themselves.  In essence, her goal is to design airways for breathing.

Learn more about Lois Laynee & Restorative Breathing

Splichal headshot professional

 

 

Dr Emily Splichal, New York City  

Dr Emily Splichal, Podiatrist and Human Movement Specialist, is the Founder of the Evidence Based Fitness Academy, Creator of the Barefoot Training Specialist®, BarefootRx® and BARE® Workout Certifications and Inventor of Naboso Technology.

With over 16 years in the fitness industry, Dr Splichal has dedicated her medical career towards studying postural alignment and human movement as it relates to barefoot science and foot to core sequencing.

Learn more about Dr Emily & Naboso Technology
Stick Mobility Team

Stick Mobility Team, California 

Take your health and performance training to the next level with Stick Mobility. From CrossFit to the Weekend Warrior, Strength Training to Post Rehab, Desk Jockey to Longevity, Stick Mobility is a force multiplier to get to you to the next level of movement and performance.

This revolutionary new training system benefits everyone through a progressive approach to fitness, mobility, and muscle activation, regardless of age or level of performance.  Simple, fun and effective.  Stick Mobility will unlock the inhibited movements that prevent optimal function and health.

Learn more about Stick Mobility 

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Learn more about the Barefoot Training Summit

September 23 – 24, 2017  |  New York City 

Registration Fee:  $399 USD 

Barefoot Strong Training Summits 2017 Flyer

http://www.barefootstrongsummit.com

 

 

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Foot Function & Fascial Lines Series

Now Available Naboso Barefoot Insoles : Advancing the Science of Proprioceptive Insoles

Imagine experiencing the same proprioceptive stimulation and neuromuscular control you do barefoot – but in your shoes!

VivoThe concept of enhanced neuromuscular control in footwear was first introduced by the advance in minimal footwear.   From Vibram FiveFingers to VivoBarefoot shoe companies and footwear are now allowing more and more natural foot function than ever before.

With minimal shoes featuring minimal cushion, no shank or midsole and no heel toe drop, this is one of the best categories of footwear for optimal foot function.

Unfortunately despite these great features, one thing that is still lacking in minimal footwear is the stimulation or utilization of all possible proprioceptive input!

The Power of Plantar Proprioceptors  

The skin on the bottom of the foot has very unique proprioceptors which are sensitive to different stimulation.   This stimulation includes vibration, light touch, deep pressure, texture and skin stretch.

Much of the work I speak during EBFA Education is about or references the importance of vibration and it’s importance during dynamic movement, such as walking.   The minimal footwear which was mentioned above is great for allowing optimal vibratory stimulation which is necessary for the auto-correction of initial contact and for enhancing movement accuracy.

But what about the other important stimuli that is necessary for the control of dynamic movement?

One such stimulation which we can take advantage of is sensed by haptic or touch receptors in the feet – this stimuli is texture.    Texture and the ability to sense rough vs. smooth is also used in the control of dynamic posture, shifts in center of gravity and joint position sense.

Are all textures created equal? 

IMG_1918Texture is one of the primary proprioceptive stimuli targeted through Naboso Technology and has been shown to have some impressive and immediate effects on the neuromuscular system.

The unique and patent-pending textural design of Naboso Technology is based on the latest surface science and texture research.   So to answer our question above – NO – not all texture is created equal.   There is a specific texture you need to create a neuromuscular response.

A couple examples of the power of texture includes: 

A 2016 study by Steinberg et al. found that textured insoles in ballet dance shoes enhanced the rate of ankle joint position sense.  This translated to enhanced movement accuracy and faster rates of stabilization in the dancers.   This research supports and opens up the opportunity for the application of Naboso Insoles in athletic performance and injury prevention during shod sports.

A 2014 study by Clark et al. found that textured insoles decreased prefrontal activity during gait which translated to enhanced automaticity of gait.   As we age the less subconscious our gait becomes which greatly contributes to fall risk.   This research unlocks the potential of Naboso Insoles in reducing falls and enhancing balance in seniors or those suffering from post-stroke, Parkinson’s, Multiple Sclerosis + more.

Your Naboso Insole Questions Answered

I get quite a few questions as it relates to Naboso Insoles with some of the most common questions including:

How are Naboso Insoles different from orthotics? 

Naboso Insole target proprioception while orthotics are designed to alter or control biomechanics of the foot.    As I always mention in my workshops – the foot is not just a biomechanical structure – but also a very powerful neuromuscular structure.

In many cases neuromuscular control and stimulation can trump biomechanical control of the foot and therefore both aspects of foot function need to be respected.

Naboso Insoles address optimal foot function from a neuromuscular perspective and do have an important role and function in the control of over-pronation, foot stabilization, reflexive foot stiffness and foot to core sequencing.

Can I wear socks with my Naboso Insoles? 

You can do whatever you want – however the science of proprioception and Naboso Insoles means that socks should not be worn.   Any barrier between the foot and the Naboso Insole will take away from the proprioceptive input.

In the near future we will be designing harder Naboso Insoles which will allow consumers to wear socks with the insoles and still gain optimal proprioceptive stimulation.

Can I wear my Naboso Insoles every day?   And in all shoes? 

Yes we actually encourage you to wear your Naboso Insoles every day and in all shoes.   At just 3mm in thickness the Naboso Insole will fit into almost all footwear.   The Naboso Insoles can also be cut to ensure proper fit in all your footwear.

If you find yourself feeling sensitive to the texture then we recommend gradually increasing your time to exposure with 30 minutes and increased incrementally each day.

Where can I buy Naboso Insoles?  

Naboso Insoles are AVAILABLE NOW! at our special pre-order rate of $30 USD (regular rate is $50 USD).    Simply click on the link below and you’ll be brought straight to our online store.

http://nabosotechnology.com/naboso-insoles/

We ship to all countries and allow 30 day return policy to all US-based orders.

Are you ready to experience barefoot stimulation in a shod environment?     Experience Naboso Barefoot Insoles today!

 

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