A New Approach to Improving Mobility in Peripheral Neuropathy

Feeling pain, tingling, numbness, or weakness in your hands or feet may be a sign of peripheral neuropathy.  With over 20 million Americans diagnosed with peripheral neuropathy, this is a quite common condition or symptom of other conditions.

The goal of managing peripheral neuropathy should be to maintain and restore the function of your peripheral nervous system, as well as optimize movement and mobility to ensure a sufficient level of function.  Managing peripheral neuropathy involves making healthy lifestyle choices, exercise, vitamin supplementation – and now for the first time a novel insole!

Sensory Insoles Enhance Foot Awareness

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Naboso Neuro Insoles http://www.nabosotechnology.com

To help stimulate the nerves on the bottom of your foot, you need to do more than just wear properly fitting footwear.  A new option to stimulate your foot’s nerves is to use textured insoles specifically designed to improve movement and function.

Naboso Technology proprioceptive insoles accurately and precisely stimulate the foot’s nervous system.   The small nerves on the bottom of your foot are sensitive to different stimuli, including vibration, texture, touch, and pressure.  The foot’s nerves receive this information and use it to help you maintain balance and posture. They also use it to control your muscles.

All Footwear Blocks Important Sensory Information

Wearing shoes — even minimal footwear — blocks some of the stimulation the plantar foot receives.  This damping of sensory information results in a delay in the stimulation of the central nervous system which can affect balance and movement.

The ideal sensory environment is to not wear shoes, however walking barefoot is not always possible.  Also, for people suffering from reduced foot sensitivity due to peripheral neuropathy, walking barefoot may increase the risk of injury.

If you can’t walk barefoot, this doesn’t mean you need to compromise sensory stimulation.  Fortunately, Naboso Technology has developed a solution for this exact problem: textured sensory insoles that you can insert in your everyday footwear.

What Does the Science Say?

Research studies have shown the benefit of textured insoles for people with chronic neurological conditions such as diabetes.  Naboso Technology, has taken this texture research and surface science to created their proprioceptive insoles. These insoles are ideal for people with decreased sensitivity of the feet. Inserting them into properly fitting shoes has been shown to improve posture, balance, and mobility.

The benefits of Naboso Technology insoles for people with peripheral neuropathy include the following:

•         Increased foot stimulation, which increases the sensitivity of the foot

•         Improved gait, which reduces the risk of falls

•         Enhanced peripheral nerve stimulation, which promotes nerve function and regeneration

•         Improved posture and balance, which help you regain your confidence in your ability to walk and stand

Conclusion

The Naboso Technology insoles are a safe and effective way to promote optimal connection between the foot’s nerves and the brain. Therefore, they can play an important role in neuro-rehabilitation programs.

Beside insoles, Naboso Technology material is also integrated into proprioceptive training mats. They can help ensure your foot’s nerves receive proper stimulation when you exercise barefoot.

Maintaining good balance, coordination, and movement is important for everyone. But it’s key to your wellness when you live with peripheral neuropathy. Increased mobility and balance can help you maintain your quality of life.

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